Becoming a part of the solution: The Metastatic Prostate Cancer Project

Becoming a part of the solution: The Metastatic Prostate Cancer Project

The Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is one of the most sophisticated bioscience and biotechnology research centers in North America. It seeks to empower a revolution in biomedicine that will accelerate the speed at which we can conquer disease. The Metastatic Prostate Cancer Project is a new initiative being coordinated by the Broad Institute. Initially, it will allow any patient in North America with advanced or metastatic prostate cancer to contribute his personal genetic, genomic, and clinical data to the development of the world's most comprehensive database on advanced prostate cancer permitting the entire prostate cancer research community access this database and accelerate discoveries related to the management of advanced prostate cancer. The prostate cancer panel led by Mike Scott will be talking to Dr. Eli Van Allen about the project. 

 

Panelists

Talk Recorded on Feb. 21, 2018, 5 p.m. EST </> Embed

Hear Talk Audio




  • Anonymous User Feb. 22, 2018, 8:56 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to Qs from Anonymous User(s) on Feb 21: The findings of this project are all currently anonymized since this is a research project. HOWEVER, as Dr. Van Allen stated on the call last night, the research team is conscious that when they find patients with rare mutations -- particularly rare mutations for whom we already know (or may learn in the future) respond well to specific types of therapy, there is arguably a responsibility to convey that information back to the patient and/or his physician(s). The research team is therefore looking into how best they may be able to do that without interfering in the relationship between the patient and his clinical team.

  • Anonymous User Feb. 22, 2018, 8:56 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to Qs from Anonymous User(s) on Feb 21: The findings of this project are all currently anonymized since this is a research project. HOWEVER, as Dr. Van Allen stated on the call last night, the research team is conscious that when they find patients with rare mutations -- particularly rare mutations for whom we already know (or may learn in the future) respond well to specific types of therapy, there is arguably a responsibility to convey that information back to the patient and/or his physician(s). The research team is therefore looking into how best they may be able to do that without interfering in the relationship between the patient and his clinical team.

  • Anonymous User Feb. 21, 2018, 5:52 p.m.  US/Eastern

    To clarify, if your research network comes up with a finding that applies to a member of your panel who has a rare mutation, how will that information be transmitted to his medical team ... or will it?

  • Anonymous User Feb. 21, 2018, 5:07 p.m.  US/Eastern

    I've submitted a sputum and blood sample. Will I ever get any personal results or are they all wrapped up in a general, non-specific summary?

  • Jan Manarite Feb. 20, 2018, 9:01 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to Anonymous User, Feb 20 - Question, ""Now it appears that the immune response produced by ablation, combined with intra-tumoral injection of immunotherapy agents, such as Yervoy, Opdivo and Keytruda, (combination) can create a highly effective anti-cancer immune response with eradication of cancer, even beyond the directly treated site." Anyone familiar with this approach to metastatic prostate cancer (and other cancers) performed by Dr. Jason Williams? Here's a link to his web site: https://www.williamscancerinstitute.com/procedures" Answer - Dr Van Allen will be able to answer this much better than me. I would say that we know every cancer is different, and we know every prostate cancer is different....so statements about immunotherapy that are too broad or generalized probably don't pan out. Mike has written about immunotherapy quite a bit. You can find his writings here - https://prostatecancerinfolink.net/?s=immunotherapy

  • Anonymous User Feb. 20, 2018, 7:33 a.m.  US/Eastern

    "Now it appears that the immune response produced by ablation, combined with intra-tumoral injection of immunotherapy agents, such as Yervoy, Opdivo and Keytruda, (combination) can create a highly effective anti-cancer immune response with eradication of cancer, even beyond the directly treated site." Anyone familiar with this approach to metastatic prostate cancer (and other cancers) performed by Dr. Jason Williams? Here's a link to his web site: https://www.williamscancerinstitute.com/procedures/

  • Anonymous User Feb. 19, 2018, 8:57 p.m.  US/Eastern

    Answer to Anonymous User, Feb 15 - Question "I have metastatic prostate cancer which is currently well under control (initially ADT & Docetaxel, followed by prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Currently under Zoladex, Enzalutamide and Denosumab, PSA < 0.01). Two years ago, after the prostatectomy, I had a sample of the cancerous tissue from the prostate tested for BRCA1/2 and the test was positive for BRCA2. A test of my blood which I did a year later came back negative, i.e. no germ-line BRCA1/2. Would you expect that metastases would also show BRCA2 mutation and hence - if necessary - be treatable with a PARP-inhibitor? Thank you very much for your thoughts! " Answer - I will let Dr Van Allen answer this one on Wed night. This is still something I'm learning about, and he'll have a MUCH better answer than me. Here, however, is a really helpful/interesting video from Dr Leonard Gomella which covers your question in part I think - https://www.urotoday.com/video-lectures/lugpa-gu-oncology/video/mediaitem/853-embedded-media2017-11-10-19-02-51.html

  • Jan Manarite Feb. 19, 2018, 11:26 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to Anonymous User. Feb 13 - Question - "HAVE PROSTATE CANCER AGAIN RADIATION FAILED DOC - WANTS USE 30 YEAR OLD HORMONAL THERAPY I KNOW THERE'S A MUCH BETTER WAY DEAL... PERHAPS PHARMA. OTHER NEW THERAPYS SYMPTOMS ARE VERY MILD SPA JUMPED 1 TO 4.55 IN TWO YRS... " Answer - "Good for you for checking your PSA pattern. Measuring both the PSA and the PSA doubling time is always helpful. I calculated your PSADT and got a PSADT of about 11 months. I used this link - http://www.doubling-time.com/compute-PSA-doubling-time.php. Also - ask your doctor about the possibility of "PSA bounce", or "PSA bump" after radiation, which is NOT cancer recurrence. You can read more about that here - https://prostatecancerinfolink.net/2016/04/18/another-reason-to-love-your-bounces/ And Here - https://www.harvardprostateknowledge.org/what-is-a-psa-bounce

  • Jan Manarite Feb. 19, 2018, 11:16 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to Anonymous User from Feb 13 - Question - "I have State IV prostate cancer metastases. I'm currently being treated by an oncologist here in Boynton Beach, Florida. Naturally I'm interested in any new developments, procedures and in particular clinical trails that might help with this scourge. I would kindly appreciate any pertinent information pertaining to the above related subjects Thank you in advance. " Answer - There are a lot of treatments along this road. I was the advocate for my husband's metastatic prostate cancer for 13 years. He lived far longer than anyone expected, including his doctors. So, it's a complicated question, and the journey is 1 step at a time in my experience. The most important thing I learned was to get copies of medical records and learn about my husband's personal prostate cancer markers and issues - because everyone's different. That became the key to asking better questions. Better questions got us better answers. BTW - I will be speaking at the W Palm Bch support group at 7:00 pm on Thursday, March 1st. You can find details on our InfoLink Social Network - http://prostatecancerinfolink.ning.com/events/jan-speaks-at-w-palm-bch-support-grp

  • Jan Manarite Feb. 19, 2018, 11:11 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Reply to anonymous, from Feb 13 - Question - "Read the following article on tapeworm drug that fights prostate cancer. Are there any opinions on using NTZ (nitazoxanide) for the treatment of prostate cancer with a Gleeson score of 7 and PSA of 5.61? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171114091850.htm" Answer - I really know nothing about this drug, and the research appears to be in cell lines (petry dishes, etc). So it's super-preliminary, and cell line research doesn't always prove true in animals. And animal research doesn't always prove true in humans. Research is a long road...

  • Anonymous User Feb. 19, 2018, 10:04 a.m.  US/Eastern

    Answer to Anonymous User from Jan 25th - Question: "I am currently taking a very effective medication (Zytiga 1000mg) which lowered my PSA from 2.02 to .09 after approximately 6 months of taking this medication. If this medication become ineffective in the future are there limitations on how many other medications may be available?" Answer: I don't believe anyone really knows the answer to that, and every prostate cancer patient is different. Your Gleason Score, your overall health and other things will play into your personal treatment decisions. But from my experience in 13 yrs of caregiving, and 15 yrs of teaching and advocacy, I would say this: (1) Assuming you are metastatic, you can begin researching these treatments (*) PROVENGE (*) Xtandi (*) Taxotere (*) Xofigo (*) Jevtana. Remember, too, that no one knows if you can have success repeating a treatment later - because we've never studied it. So just because you fail Zytiga once, doesn't mean you can't talk to your doctor about the idea of trying it a 2nd time later. It remains a great question, so it's worth keeping in the discussion. Hope that helps, Jan Manarite

  • Anonymous User Feb. 15, 2018, 10:58 a.m.  US/Eastern

    I have metastatic prostate cancer which is currently well under control (initially ADT & Docetaxel, followed by prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Currently under Zoladex, Enzalutamide and Denosumab, PSA < 0.01). Two years ago, after the prostatectomy, I had a sample of the cancerous tissue from the prostate tested for BRCA1/2 and the test was positive for BRCA2. A test of my blood which I did a year later came back negative, i.e. no germ-line BRCA1/2. Would you expect that metastases would also show BRCA2 mutation and hence - if necessary - be treatable with a PARP-inhibitor? Thank you very much for your thoughts!

  • Anonymous User Feb. 13, 2018, 4:49 p.m.  US/Eastern

    HAVE PROSTATE CANCER AGAIN RADIATION FAILED DOC - WANTS USE 30 YEAR OLD HORMONAL THERAPY I KNOW THERE'S A MUCH BETTER WAY DEAL... PERHAPS PHARMA. OTHER NEW THERAPYS SYMPTOMS ARE VERY MILD SPA JUMPED 1 TO 4.55 IN TWO YRS...

  • Anonymous User Feb. 13, 2018, 1:09 p.m.  US/Eastern

    I have State IV prostate cancer metastases. I'm currently being treated by an oncologist here in Boynton Beach, Florida. Naturally I'm interested in any new developments, procedures and in particular clinical trails that might help with this scourge. I would kindly appreciate any pertinent information pertaining to the above related subjects Thank you in advance.

  • anonymous Feb. 13, 2018, 1:02 p.m.  US/Eastern

    Read the following article on tapeworm drug that fights prostate cancer. Are there any opinions on using NTZ (nitazoxanide) for the treatment of prostate cancer with a Gleeson score of 7 and PSA of 5.61? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171114091850.htm

  • Anonymous User Jan. 25, 2018, 7:10 p.m.  US/Eastern

    I am currently taking a very effective medication (Zytiga 1000mg) which lowered my PSA from 2.02 to .09 after approximately 6 months of taking this medication. If this medication become ineffective in the future are there limitations on how many other medications may be available?